Jo M. Orise Painting – Committed to My Craft

You guessed by now. I painted most of the time I spent in Florida this past winter. I also worked on my MS (manuscript)—but that is a whole other story.   ;-) wink.

Edward Gay at his easel working on a painting....
Edward Gay at his easel working on a painting. Inscription lower right: “Edward Gay, Jan. 1907”. Gay, Edward, 1837-1928 Collection: Macbeth Gallery Records, c. 1890-1964 Accession number: aaa_macbgall_4699 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

When I paint I get into a  “flow state.” Nothing around me is real. My only concerns are line, shape and color. What color will work with another color, or needs to be next to what color.

Color is complicated. A subject artists continue to explore. One does not possess all the answers. Nor is there only one way, or right way to lay color onto canvas or paper.

Some artists have a technique, others experiment and others have  a ‘gimmick’. Some artists know how they will approach color for their current painting. It depends on the mood, lighting or effect desired.

If I have a visitor in my studio and that person is quiet or asks one or two questions about art or the effect I am working toward, I don’t have a problem with that. But, if that person engages in useless banter or is verbose by nature, I have a problem.

Signs of a ‘Flow State.’
Talk to me and I will bite your face. LOL

At the easel, lots of activity happens inside my brain. It is all about the process, painting and creating. I am focused, I am  in a  “flow state.” (Click link.)

One day, Hubby invited Neighbor to ‘chat’ with me because I was available in my open-to-the-rest-of-the-house studio in FL. So Neighbor and Hubby stood at my elbow talking about ‘stuff’ I had no interest in contributing to, and joked about the amount of snow I included in the winter scene I worked on. The conversation went nowhere, so did my attempt to paint. So, I put my brush down and went to the kitchen for water. They followed.

When Neighbor left, I asked Hubby not to bring anyone to my studio when I was busy.

“You didn’t look busy. Neighbor wanted to see what you were doing. I thought you wouldn’t mind,” Hubby replied.

“If I am staring at a blank canvas, or a painting that is propped on an easel, it does not mean I am ‘not busy.’ My mind is very busy. I am communing with my muse. I make decisions every second I stand or sit facing the canvas.  Whether I hold a brush or not my mind is occupied.

Artists for Humanity. Artist in painting studio
Artists for Humanity. Artist in painting studio (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“If I am using watercolors, a distraction will ruin an effect I am trying to create because the paint dried. The opportunity for that effect on that particular painting is gone.

“I do not ‘color’ a picture, I create an illusion, an idea, an effect. If I want to color I will use crayons and a coloring book and welcome anyone who wants to chat as I color the sky blue, the grass green and the face pink.

“If company arrives, please ask me before inviting them to the studio. I will let you know if it is okay. Be assured this is not a personal attack or rejection. It is just what people need to know about me and how I work.”

Other artists may love constant companionship as they work. But in every classroom I was part of, every workshop I participated in, every person I taught to draw and paint, all were focused and none chatted.

Last year, I joined a group of figure/portrait artists. All went well. Not one artist spoke except for the moderator.

During a couple of our painting sessions, one or two artists left early or moved their easel.

N.C. Wyeth in his studio with a cowboy model
N.C. Wyeth in his studio with a cowboy model (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

At break time, most of the artists were surprised some had gone or others had moved to a different spot for a another perspective—something their muse had advised.

The artists had been in a group “flow state.” We may have seen the activity in the corner or our eye, but it did not register for most of us.

This figure painting group hired live models who posed for fifteen minute time intervals. A particular model said a few jokes one day. No one responded, except for a couple of giggles. The artists looked to each other and to the moderator. Then other jokes and tidbits of personal information were offered by the model.

At break time one artist said he was ready to leave because he could not focus if the model continued to be disruptive. The mediator shared  an experience when she was enrolled in a college, master of art program, “When the class painted, chit chat was not tolerated. The offender was cast out of the room.”

The model apologized. He returned the next week. All was well.

Artists are not anti-social. Just very committed to their craft.

Have you ever been in a  “flow state?” Artists, athletes, people with special skills or training know what it is like.

Let me know and share your experience.

New Work by Jo

I’m working on a few different paintings. 

One is a portrait of a boy with a conch while sailing on a schooner. Been thinking about this one for a few years and decided to just give it a try. His mom sent the photo for me to create this portrait three years ago, but she has not yet placed the order.

She has contacted me three years in a row, but still no order. She has purchased some of my artwork and loves them.

first sketch by Jo M. Orise

Therefore, I wonder why she changed her mind each time for the protrait.

Now this picture is in my head and wants out.

What do I do?

Draw it. Experiment with it. Lots of fun as I challenge myself in the process.

Here you see the first drawing in my sketchbook. It was okay. After noting things that need to be changed, I drew it on water color paper that had been soaked and stapled to a board to shrink tight.

Still, I put off painting.

So, I got another piece of water color paper, soaked it and just started painting the figure and its surroundings—no stapling, no drawing, just painting.

Boy With Conch Aboard.
by: Jo M. Orise

First it was wet-on-wet technique, then wet-on-dry.

What do you think?

I usually draw a few fine lines and erase them later. None of that here. Like I said it is pretty rough…but fun to do and see.

Next, I’ll just pull out the prepped water color paper that has the last drawing waiting for me.  I look forward to this last part. It will be fun and I’ll post the finished piece.

See my other protraits at jomorise.com .

Looking for comments, tips.

BTW, the wavy looking boom is really the warping of the water color paper. That will straighten out in time.

Leave a comment or a post. I love to know what people think.

Jo

Jo M. Orise Art Update – September, 2015

Solo Exhibition by Jo M. Orise

You are invited to a solo art exhibition of new and older works, which include oils, acrylics and water colors. There are a couple of water color limited edition prints.

Owls Head Light by Jo M. Oriseoil on canvas 10 x 14″

Location: The Brown Bag Restaurant Cafe, 606 Main Street, Rockland, ME.

The month of September, 2015.

Restaurant hours: 
Breakfast:
Thur, Fri, Sat 7:30 am – 10 am
Lunch:
Tues – Sat 10 am – 3 pm,

Bakery hours: Mon – Fri 10 am – 3 pm, Sat 7:30 am – 3 pm.

If you can’t find what you want, contact me and we can talk about creating the perfect painting for you and your home.

Whether you purchase or just view the artwork, please take a card and send me a note. Let me know what you think about the pieces. I always love to hear from viewers. Critiques are always welcome.
Image 
While you are at the Brown Bag, try their great food creations.

Chef Kelvin performs magic at the cook-stove.

The staff is friendly and fun to talk to. They are like family.

If you get to know the regular customers, you’ll find them friendly with great stories to share. You must go there and experience the ambiance. Our first visit was in 1999 and we got hooked.

So, friends—and soon to be friends—go to the Brown Bag Restaurant Cafe, enjoy the food, look at my artwork. If one moves you, an employee will be happy to remove it from the wall for you and assist you with it’s purchase.

Bring an artwork(s) home—you will have something special to enjoy for years to come.

 Visit my website: www.jomorise.com

I Have Things To Do

English: Belted Galloway Cattle, Bishopstone. ...
English: Belted Galloway Cattle, Bishopstone. The Belties of Faulston Manor waiting to be taken to there new field. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“Can’t do that just now, dear. Not possible, ask me later…” My  mantra this past year as I painted similar scenes over and over again. My goal was to create a series of belted galloway (aka: belties) paintings and ocean scenes of the Maine coast.

Hubby and friends repeatedly ask, “Why are you painting cows?” Why not? They are part of the same ecosphere I belong to. The more I look at them, the more I see what they are. I feel a sadness in their limited existence. We know the specter of slaughter looms ahead for the breed. Their eyes divulge innocence and desperation. Is the desperation in my mind? Are they able to decipher the reduction in population in their meadow could mean their time is coming up—never to be seen again? We get around that chilling idea as we focus on the beauty of their pastoral existence whereby observers with a sense of aesthetics stop to take notice or snap a photo.

Belties Red Glow
Artist: Jo M. Orise

One of my college professors chided a few students who claimed they could not finding proper subject matter worthy of their attention to paint from their ‘limited’ surroundings. Worthy subject matter? Open your eyes. Worthy subject matter is all around you.

Curtis Island Light
Artist: Jo M. Orise

Don’t just look, see what you are looking at. You’ll find something interesting for a painting or poem or story. Compose a few thumbnails, write a rough draft—do something then think it over. At least you’ve begun a process.

Not all creations are masterpieces. Learn your craft and learn to throw away work that doesn’t meet your goal as a pretty good piece. Who decides a creation is a masterpiece anyway? Not the artist.

Paint, write, create whatever you wish, but do it with passion, don’t be afraid to chuck it and start fresh. Keep learning as you go. Spend hours studying your artwork’s progress, reading what you’ve written. Share with people of similar interests what you’ve done, listen to their comments. Don’t take their critiques as personal indictments of your incompetence. Listen and learn from these comments and thank the person who critiques for having the courage to tell you what she/he thinks.

Decided what you are happy with and then leave it alone. Let time pass then return to your work and decide if it is still good enough. Go on to your next creation and you will see growth and greater understanding of your craft and your ecosphere.

Picture found at:
https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?
fbid=553259461381583&set=a.3672496
13315903.85664.354522044588660&type=1&theater

Here is a pictures of egosphere and ecosphere, which I thought interesting and to the point.

What do you think.

Post a comment below. Love to hear from you.

Have You Heard of Akiane – Such a Beautiful Name

akiane
akiane (Photo credit: 漂泊的鱼)

What a wonderful person. So young, so passionate with such a supportive family and the future for this young girl is mind boggling.  
Visit her website: http://www.akiane.com
Check out her interview at fifteen years. She also has time-lapse painting on her site. Enjoy!
______________
Akiane’s story speaks to me. I also yearned to draw and paint people since childhood. The urge is still there and haunts me as I go on in my daily activities. Therefore, I can relate with Akiane‘s description of her inspiration. I haven’t had the visions she describes, but I do have sudden ideas and dreams that I write about in poems, and stories and also sketch them until I feel I have to produce a painting.
Many of my paintings are of typical scenes I see around me, but they speak to me. I see the beauty, the color and the mood. The dreams are different. They are emotional expressions, which I capture in pencil or paint. Critics look at them and either like them or are unable to relate. 
As I paint or write, time disappears and I am at one with my creation. I continue  to learn from my work, my mistakes, my critics and admirers. That is part of growing and learning. Not every work is a masterpiece. Not every masterpiece is accepted by the public. Sometimes a painting I think is ‘trash’ excites a person to purchase it.
Visit Akiane’s website and enjoy the wonder of her and her great talents—she has many. I would love to meet her some day.

Post a comment below and let me know what you think.

Thanks,

Jo
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