Art Update: Aug. 16 – Sept. 14, 2019

“Wild Things”

Endurance72dpi.jpg
Nature Speaks – Endurance, by: Jo M. Orise – oil on canvas, gallery wrap 18×24″

Art Opening and Reception

Where: River Arts Gallery, Route 1, Damariscotta, ME
When:  Opening reception: August 16 –  5 to 7 pm
Public view and purchase: August 16 – September 14, 2019
Hours:  Tuesday – Saturday 10 – 4 pm
Sunday 11:00-3:00 pm

Contact: 207-563-1507
email: info@riveratsme.org

Having submitted an artwork to be juried for the “Wild Things” show, I learned 208 paintings were submitted, and 80 were selected by the jurying process.

I was one of the lucky 80! That sounds like the title of a book or at least a movie.

I am so pleased. So many paintings. And a theme show to boot!

I usually avoided “Theme” shows—until this year. I was accepted at the last show and now this show. Two theme shows in a row! How great is that?

Why do I avoid “Themes”? Well…my brain doesn’t work that way. Suggest a theme, my mind is blank.

I literally interpret the message…then it gets complicated in my little head. It feels like I don’t fit in my head. Nor do I fit in the group who is part the whole event.

They get it. I don’t.

My examples draw a lot of blank stares and gaping mouths.

Hmmm.

I go home and have coffee. I stare at my easel. Whiteness. That is what I see. Well, lately it is grayness—I tint my canvas prior to painting. Gray can make paint “zing” or can depress you. Like sitting in a little corner asking “why don’t I think that way?”

But this time, upon examining available paintings hanging in my studio, I forced myself to think beyond the painted subject. It worked—twice in two months!

However, I fear my time as a theme painter is limited.

But then…

Join us.

Have a glass of wine, a few goodies and let’s chat about art—everyone’s art. Most participating artists attend the opening.

We artists will be happy to speak with anyone interested in art.

Give a holler, leave a comment and a like.

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JMO

I Have Things To Do

English: Belted Galloway Cattle, Bishopstone. ...
English: Belted Galloway Cattle, Bishopstone. The Belties of Faulston Manor waiting to be taken to there new field. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“Can’t do that just now, dear. Not possible, ask me later…” My  mantra this past year as I painted similar scenes over and over again. My goal was to create a series of belted galloway (aka: belties) paintings and ocean scenes of the Maine coast.

Hubby and friends repeatedly ask, “Why are you painting cows?” Why not? They are part of the same ecosphere I belong to. The more I look at them, the more I see what they are. I feel a sadness in their limited existence. We know the specter of slaughter looms ahead for the breed. Their eyes divulge innocence and desperation. Is the desperation in my mind? Are they able to decipher the reduction in population in their meadow could mean their time is coming up—never to be seen again? We get around that chilling idea as we focus on the beauty of their pastoral existence whereby observers with a sense of aesthetics stop to take notice or snap a photo.

Belties Red Glow
Artist: Jo M. Orise

One of my college professors chided a few students who claimed they could not finding proper subject matter worthy of their attention to paint from their ‘limited’ surroundings. Worthy subject matter? Open your eyes. Worthy subject matter is all around you.

Curtis Island Light
Artist: Jo M. Orise

Don’t just look, see what you are looking at. You’ll find something interesting for a painting or poem or story. Compose a few thumbnails, write a rough draft—do something then think it over. At least you’ve begun a process.

Not all creations are masterpieces. Learn your craft and learn to throw away work that doesn’t meet your goal as a pretty good piece. Who decides a creation is a masterpiece anyway? Not the artist.

Paint, write, create whatever you wish, but do it with passion, don’t be afraid to chuck it and start fresh. Keep learning as you go. Spend hours studying your artwork’s progress, reading what you’ve written. Share with people of similar interests what you’ve done, listen to their comments. Don’t take their critiques as personal indictments of your incompetence. Listen and learn from these comments and thank the person who critiques for having the courage to tell you what she/he thinks.

Decided what you are happy with and then leave it alone. Let time pass then return to your work and decide if it is still good enough. Go on to your next creation and you will see growth and greater understanding of your craft and your ecosphere.

Picture found at:
https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?
fbid=553259461381583&set=a.3672496
13315903.85664.354522044588660&type=1&theater

Here is a pictures of egosphere and ecosphere, which I thought interesting and to the point.

What do you think.

Post a comment below. Love to hear from you.