Jo M. Orise – August, 2016 Art Update

“Friendship – The Nudge”
by: Jo M. Orise

Saturday, August 13 (9-4 PM)- Sunday, August 14 (9-1 PM), 2016

Come to the Aldermere Farm, annual art show located in Rockport, ME.

I have submitted ten original framed paintings,  and fifteen matted prints. This year Aldermere has changed from a one day show to a two day show. That is fantastic! Lots of folks new to the area usually find out too late that there was a show that day they visited Camden and Rockport area. Waiting for a year to fit the popular, annual show into their schedule is always ‘iffy.’
Two days makes it easier for all. After all, there will be featured more than 200 paintings. Amazing! Under one roof too.

Beltie Stroll
by: Jo M. Orise

Now, hanging that many paintings is an extreme challenge. I insisted on helping out last year. I was glad I did. I gained an appreciation as to how much hard work Aldermere goes through to plan and set up such a show. Due to a prior commitment, I contributed a half day’s assistance in hanging artwork. They appreciated it and I was happy to volunteer.
Aldermere Farm in Rockport, features beautiful Belties and is a non-profit trust focused on farming and agriculture. We artists donate a portion of our profits to the organization.
Aldermere Farm has a store that is open to the public where they sell crafts and healthy, quality beef.

_________________

If you are in the area, please do drop in and help support the local artists and Aldermere’s non-profit farm.

 _________________

The show is to be held this coming weekend, August 13, 9-4 PM and August 14, 9-1 PM at the historic farmhouse located on the Aldermere Farm, 20 Russell Ave in Rockport, Maine.

Leave a comment. Love to hear from all of you.

Jo M. Orise Painting – Committed to My Craft

You guessed by now. I painted most of the time I spent in Florida this past winter. I also worked on my MS (manuscript)—but that is a whole other story.   ;-) wink.

Edward Gay at his easel working on a painting....
Edward Gay at his easel working on a painting. Inscription lower right: “Edward Gay, Jan. 1907”. Gay, Edward, 1837-1928 Collection: Macbeth Gallery Records, c. 1890-1964 Accession number: aaa_macbgall_4699 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

When I paint I get into a  “flow state.” Nothing around me is real. My only concerns are line, shape and color. What color will work with another color, or needs to be next to what color.

Color is complicated. A subject artists continue to explore. One does not possess all the answers. Nor is there only one way, or right way to lay color onto canvas or paper.

Some artists have a technique, others experiment and others have  a ‘gimmick’. Some artists know how they will approach color for their current painting. It depends on the mood, lighting or effect desired.

If I have a visitor in my studio and that person is quiet or asks one or two questions about art or the effect I am working toward, I don’t have a problem with that. But, if that person engages in useless banter or is verbose by nature, I have a problem.

Signs of a ‘Flow State.’
Talk to me and I will bite your face. LOL

At the easel, lots of activity happens inside my brain. It is all about the process, painting and creating. I am focused, I am  in a  “flow state.” (Click link.)

One day, Hubby invited Neighbor to ‘chat’ with me because I was available in my open-to-the-rest-of-the-house studio in FL. So Neighbor and Hubby stood at my elbow talking about ‘stuff’ I had no interest in contributing to, and joked about the amount of snow I included in the winter scene I worked on. The conversation went nowhere, so did my attempt to paint. So, I put my brush down and went to the kitchen for water. They followed.

When Neighbor left, I asked Hubby not to bring anyone to my studio when I was busy.

“You didn’t look busy. Neighbor wanted to see what you were doing. I thought you wouldn’t mind,” Hubby replied.

“If I am staring at a blank canvas, or a painting that is propped on an easel, it does not mean I am ‘not busy.’ My mind is very busy. I am communing with my muse. I make decisions every second I stand or sit facing the canvas.  Whether I hold a brush or not my mind is occupied.

Artists for Humanity. Artist in painting studio
Artists for Humanity. Artist in painting studio (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“If I am using watercolors, a distraction will ruin an effect I am trying to create because the paint dried. The opportunity for that effect on that particular painting is gone.

“I do not ‘color’ a picture, I create an illusion, an idea, an effect. If I want to color I will use crayons and a coloring book and welcome anyone who wants to chat as I color the sky blue, the grass green and the face pink.

“If company arrives, please ask me before inviting them to the studio. I will let you know if it is okay. Be assured this is not a personal attack or rejection. It is just what people need to know about me and how I work.”

Other artists may love constant companionship as they work. But in every classroom I was part of, every workshop I participated in, every person I taught to draw and paint, all were focused and none chatted.

Last year, I joined a group of figure/portrait artists. All went well. Not one artist spoke except for the moderator.

During a couple of our painting sessions, one or two artists left early or moved their easel.

N.C. Wyeth in his studio with a cowboy model
N.C. Wyeth in his studio with a cowboy model (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

At break time, most of the artists were surprised some had gone or others had moved to a different spot for a another perspective—something their muse had advised.

The artists had been in a group “flow state.” We may have seen the activity in the corner or our eye, but it did not register for most of us.

This figure painting group hired live models who posed for fifteen minute time intervals. A particular model said a few jokes one day. No one responded, except for a couple of giggles. The artists looked to each other and to the moderator. Then other jokes and tidbits of personal information were offered by the model.

At break time one artist said he was ready to leave because he could not focus if the model continued to be disruptive. The mediator shared  an experience when she was enrolled in a college, master of art program, “When the class painted, chit chat was not tolerated. The offender was cast out of the room.”

The model apologized. He returned the next week. All was well.

Artists are not anti-social. Just very committed to their craft.

Have you ever been in a  “flow state?” Artists, athletes, people with special skills or training know what it is like.

Let me know and share your experience.

Jo M. Orise Art Update – September, 2015

Solo Exhibition by Jo M. Orise

You are invited to a solo art exhibition of new and older works, which include oils, acrylics and water colors. There are a couple of water color limited edition prints.

Owls Head Light by Jo M. Oriseoil on canvas 10 x 14″

Location: The Brown Bag Restaurant Cafe, 606 Main Street, Rockland, ME.

The month of September, 2015.

Restaurant hours: 
Breakfast:
Thur, Fri, Sat 7:30 am – 10 am
Lunch:
Tues – Sat 10 am – 3 pm,

Bakery hours: Mon – Fri 10 am – 3 pm, Sat 7:30 am – 3 pm.

If you can’t find what you want, contact me and we can talk about creating the perfect painting for you and your home.

Whether you purchase or just view the artwork, please take a card and send me a note. Let me know what you think about the pieces. I always love to hear from viewers. Critiques are always welcome.
Image 
While you are at the Brown Bag, try their great food creations.

Chef Kelvin performs magic at the cook-stove.

The staff is friendly and fun to talk to. They are like family.

If you get to know the regular customers, you’ll find them friendly with great stories to share. You must go there and experience the ambiance. Our first visit was in 1999 and we got hooked.

So, friends—and soon to be friends—go to the Brown Bag Restaurant Cafe, enjoy the food, look at my artwork. If one moves you, an employee will be happy to remove it from the wall for you and assist you with it’s purchase.

Bring an artwork(s) home—you will have something special to enjoy for years to come.

 Visit my website: www.jomorise.com

Floating Belties and Strong Daisies

Why has one of my latest paintings mysteriously changed position in my art bin? Floating, so it appeared to be, instead of sitting in proper position with the rest of the paintings.

“Hmmm.  Did Charlie (cat) jump into the bin and snuggle under the painting? I hope not!”
I investigate the other paintings. No paw prints, no chewed paper, not cat fur. That is strange. I adjust the painting so it is now standing as the others are in a vertical stack.

English: Belties at Old Bridge of Urr Belties ...
English: Belties at Old Bridge of Urr Belties (belted galloway cattle) in field by B794 above the hamlet Old Bridge of Urr. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Hubby walks in from his office. “I have to tell you, Hun, your latest pieces are really interesting. You are really good at revealing relationships in your paintings.”

“Thank you. I didn’t think you liked the last two.”

“Oh, no. They are really good. You’ve captured the feeling. The relationship between the two belties in your water color. You can see the affection shared between the two in your composition, and the posture of both cows. It really like it.”

I look over Hubby’s shoulder as he edits his latest letter to all his friends and relatives. He loves writing. Been at it for years. In my former employ as a teacher, I used to mail his stack of weekly letters as I arrived at work. I’d hand the collection with handwritten addresses to the receptionist  “It’s nice to know someone still writes letters,” she had smiled.

“Here, review my latest letter,” Hubby turns in his seat.

As I sort through the four pages, I am shocked to see my two latest paintings in his current letter.
“You photographed my paintings?”

“Yes. They tell a story. You captured the subjects and expressed more than the image.”

“Thank you. But you never asked.”

Hubby’s smile disappeared. “I’m sorry. I didn’t know it would be a problem.”

“I thought the cat had been in my bin. But it was you.”

“Uh, yes. Is there a problem?”

“Well, no one has seen my latest work and now you are dispersing an image of them to several people who either won’t care or will share it with others. That is not fair. You must ask first. If Jamie Wyeth’s new creation were shared that way, you would be sued. There is such a thing as copyright infringement.”

Silence.

“Why did you photograph the daisy as well?”

English: Daisies
English: Daisies (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Hubby, smiles. “You captured something I didn’t notice. As we worked at logging, moving the branches out of the way, piling the logs and cutting some into firewood, you found a little daisy struggling to survive through the disruption we imposed in its environment. You plucked it up, placed it in a tiny bottle and gave it another life.

“Then you painted it. You captured its inner being, wanting to survive, reaching for the sun. It demonstrated strength. It spoke to me. It is a simple painting, but it caught my attention—I had to write about it. You have to keep painting because you are good at it.”

Silence.

“I hope it is okay to send the letters as they are.”

Hubby’s words soothe and encourage me. They were simple paintings, not complicated as some seem to be at times. I am my own worse critic…isn’t every artist?

The printouts don’t really do justice to the colors used in the original artwork. But that is the printer’s fault. Too many browns I told Hubby as he first tested our new printer. He likes brown, I suppose.

“Okay. But ask me next time. Also, I recommend you crop the daisy better. You left one border in the painting. It distracts from the subject because it is not part of the composition.”

“Thanks, Hun.” Hubby happily edits his narrative.

“Charlie. You want some milk?”

“Meow,” the cat smiles. I swear it sounds like ‘Meowilk’. Charlie is almost human. Therefore, he wouldn’t nap in my art bin. My artwork speaks to him too: He’s afraid of cows. :-)

Hubby Burns Toast and Toaster

English: Water color painting depicting an abs...Image via Wikipedia

Abstract nude, by Jay Meuser, 1956

While painting my next masterpiece—a watercolor, I became aware of a smell in my studio. Ignoring it, I continued with the orange wash and worried not to overwhelm the surrounding colors and hoped the reflections would be believable.

Within minutes, the smell got stronger. Something was burning. “What is that smell, Hon? Did you burn something?”

“Oh, I burnt the toast. Everything is okay,” Hubby replied. He had decided, several years ago, that an aluminum pie plate or a block of wood placed over the toaster would shorten the time needed for bread to toast. I’ve chastened him every time he made burn marks on my smaller chopping blocks or when he melted the plastic on our new and cheaper toasters. He apologized each time and found a different method to implement his plan.

“Burnt toast?—Okay?—Smells like the kitchen is on fire. I can barely breathe!” I rushed to the kitchen and found something very black. “You left the burnt toast and a burnt block of pine on the counter. The kitchen is filled with smoke and the smoke is in every room of the house.”

Sorry Hon, I ran water over the toast.”

“Why didn’t you just throw it outside. If you burn something, throw it outside immediately! Otherwise, it just stinks up the house.”

This time the block of wood was burnt and smelled something awful. “The block of wood does not help save electricity, it only helps burn the toast. The block is charred all the way through. You’ll burn the house down!”

Frustrated, I picked up the burnt, wet toast and threw it out the door. As it landed in the new snow it crumbled. I placed the block of wood on the doorstep.

Now I had to air out the house! As Hubby sat reading one of his many library books, I ran from room to room opening windows and doors. To hasten the process, I grabbed a couple of newspapers to fan the smoke outside. It was about 20 degrees Fahrenheit outside and the inside temperature was dropping. I continued fanning as long as I could stand the cold.

Hubby continued reading.

As I shut windows and doors I determined patience would help me deal with the smell, which would eventually dissipate.

Upon returning to my studio, I added another glaze of orange to my painting. The results were splendid. I loved the painting. A masterpiece! Maybe not. Perhaps the next painting… .

Two weeks later, the burnt smell finally gone, I noticed a new block of oak sitting beside the toaster.

“Nice piece of wood, dear.” I admired the grain and thought of the many ways I could use this piece of beautifully grained oak. From chopping block to woodcut printing. Later, I watched Hubby proudly place this 3/4 inch, heavy piece of oak over the toaster. This board completely covered the toaster slots. With eyes rolling back in frustration, I went to my studio. Later I observed Hubby in the living room eating toast as he read his new book.

The next morning as I made breakfast, I noticed a burnt smell.  “Did you burn toast again?” I asked as I examined the block of wood. It sported two distinctive, black burn marks on the underside and it was now warped.

I placed bread in the toaster and pressed the lever. Hubby walked in and said, “Better watch your toast. I burned mine. It didn’t pop-up.”

“That’s because you had a board over the toaster.” So I prepared my eggs and cocoa. Eventually I realized something was burning. My toast was smoking and I could not release the toast. The knob was stuck. The toast would not eject. As I unplugged the toaster, I yelled, “You ruined the toaster with your damned board! Why do you keep doing that?”

Hubby replied from the living room, “Sorry, dear.”

Image via Wikipedia
electronic motherboard

After breakfast, I decided to inspect the toaster. Upon dis-assembly, I found the interior gummed with black, toast soot. Crumbs stuck to the gummy residue. I spent about an hour cleaning the parts and Hubby offered a computer cleaning spray we previously used to clean computers. I sprayed that on what looked like a motherboard. Once I was satisfied with the cleaning, I plugged the skeleton of the toaster into the outlet and pressed the lever down. It was working. Then I pressed the release button and it worked! “Hon, I fixed the toaster!”

A few minutes later I discovered the interior plastic collar that originally framed the slot where the handle traveled up and down now blocked the path formed by the slot. So I cut the hanging plastic from the slot with a hack-saw.

toaster (Photo credit: healthserviceglasses)
My beautiful toaster.

Now to re-assemble the toaster. With so many parts to hold on to, it was impossible to screw the metal sheets together. “Hon, can you come here? Hold this tight. Be careful not to let the sides pop out.”  Hubby used his muscle as he pressed the ends together. I placed enough screws so he could get back to reading. Upon turning the last screw, I proudly examined the toaster only to find one side wall had popped out. “Hon!”

Again, Hubby helped me press the parts together as I re-assembled and screwed the pieces together a second time.

Breville Appliances. From left to right: Empor...Upon inspecting the sides, I was proud of the work done. Perhaps I could repair toasters and other small appliances. In today’s economy, people could save money and I’d earn a small income to boot. There aren’t any small appliance repair shops around anymore.

Now to replace the knob and test the toaster with its handle in place. Something wasn’t right. Where was the metal arm onto which I was suppose to slip the handle? I now realized why it was so difficult to screw the toaster together, we had forced the metal arm in behind the toaster’s wall. This toaster had to be easily assembled, otherwise how could a factory justify using two to three people just to place 8 screws into the bottom of a toaster?

I dis-assembled the toaster a third time. The metal arm was just a little bent. No problem. This time I re-assemble the toaster without Hubby. Hah! I COULD repair toasters. Maybe a shingle outside the door was imminent.

Smiling as I twisted the last screw into place, I flipped the toaster and happily slipped the knob on the arm. I pressed the knob down. The toaster worked. I pressed the release and it did not return. Upon further inspection of the knob, I found the plastic neck was warped. So I went to Hubby to admonish him of his evil deed once again and showed him the now heat-deformed handle.

“Sorry, dear.”

I sanded the bulges out of the neck. Proudly placing the knob onto the arm, I pushed the knob down, pressed the release button and it worked! Glory, glory. I was going to really put some thought on this new career venture. Perhaps a web-page to advertise my services. How much would shipping a small appliance cost?

The last piece of the puzzle was the temperature dial. That was going to be the easy part. Or was it? It didn’t slip into place. Aaargh! The dial slipped in from behind the toaster wall. So, I dis-assembled the toaster a fourth time—all the way to the skeleton and the mother board. After determining the position of the handle and slipping it on, I carefully and easily re-assembled the toaster without Hubby. I did it in fifteen minutes!

The toaster looked great in its usual corner. It was sparkling and seemed happy. Only I knew what parts were now deformed or partly mutilated. But it worked! As I collected the tools and considered my new career plans, I decided that it was not for me. I lost one to three screws each time I re-assembled the toaster and spent five to fifteen minutes just hunting for screws or washers.English: toast with eyesHappy toast from now  on!

I was happy to have my toaster back.

“Hon. I fixed the toaster. Don’t you ever cover that toaster or any other toaster with anything again.”

“Sorry, dear.”

I went to my studio and realized it was now 3:30 PM. Too late to start another painting. The lighting was not right. Maybe tomorrow I’ll create a masterpiece.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Art Update, November, 2011

Scenes Around Wolfeboro, New HampshireImage by billandkent via FlickrArt update!

You will see my latest oil painting, “Birch Trees by the Lake ” —oil on canvas, in the Wolfeboro Public Library.

It hangs as part of a group show with the GWAC (Governor Wentworth Arts Council). I’ve been a member for several years. It is a great group of artists and fine craftspersons. The show will be available to view until December 1, 2011.

Also, a new painting, “Three Sandpipers”, now on display at Cattle Dog Coffee Roasters, 541 North Citrus Ave, Crystal River, FL.

The subject is a result of my observation of sand pipers at Palm City beach last year. The birds seemed to be having a discussion so I captured them and immortalize the moment. The ocean is rough and rushing in from behind as they stand in the sand at the edge of the rough sea.

Two other smaller water color paintings hang at the Hernando Shop as well. Go to Cattle Dog! They have the best coffee in the country! Their’s is the only coffee I can drink. And their pastries are spectacular. If you like really good (I mean really, really good) food for lunch, instead of a burger somewhere or a plain sandwich with little flavor, get in your car and drive up to Hernando or Crystal River and visit the Cattle Dog Coffee Roasters. They will treat you right.They also have wi-fi so you can check out my website as well.

Happy Thanksgiving to all!

Enhanced by Zemanta